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Chapter 3: Enjoyment and the Quality of Life

Most enjoyable activities are not natural; they demand an effort that initially one is reluctant to make.

Most people tend to think that happiness is what they see on TV. It is what beautiful and happy people do—vacation on tropical islands, drive fast cars, and so on. If your mind is focused on this version of happiness, it’s occupied with worrying about how to achieve these material things. This worrying is the opposite of happiness.

It is more beneficial to find out how our everyday lives can become more harmonious and satisfying. This can help us achieve things that cannot be reached through the pursuit of symbolic goals.

The pursuit of pleasure is an important element of quality of life, like eating, sleeping, and resting. Pleasure helps to maintain order; however, it cannot create a new order in our consciousness by itself. That’s why the pursuit of pleasure does not feel very rewarding.

Experiences can give you two things: pleasure and enjoyment. Pleasure feels good, but it’s not rewarding. Enjoyment, on the other hand, is a different sensation.

People naturally get huge enjoyment from growing and developing. This can be observed in children. However, due to the education system that forces us to learn things we don’t need, this enjoyment of growth and development usually disappears over time. However, the feeling of growth is one of the most important elements of flow.

An element of flow that is very important is having clear goals with immediate feedback. This means that we constantly receive information, and we can correct our course to attain the goal. Almost any type of feedback can be enjoyable, as long as it’s logically related to the goal in which one has invested psychic energy.

Principles to follow