Inside the Mindsets

I don’t divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the failures….I divide the world into the learners and non-learners.” Benjamin Barber, an eminent political theorist.

There are two meanings of ability: the fixed ability (that must be proven) and the changeable ability that you develop during learning. There are two worlds - the fixed one where you have to validate yourself, show that you are smart, where effort is a bad thing because gifted people do not fail. In the other world, effort makes you talented and smart, you develop yourself by failures and learning. We have a choice in which world we want to live. We just have to change our mindset. We also can decide on which type of relationships we want to be. Ones that raise our ego or ones that challenge us to grow.

A very interesting example of stretching beyond the possible is Christopher Reeve. He was thrown from a horse. His neck was broken, the spinal cord was severed from his brain. He was paralyzed below the neck and the doctors didn’t give him any hope. Reeve didn’t give up and against the doctors’ opinions started exercises and a stimulation program. After 5 years, Reeve started to regain movement. Brain scans showed that his brain was again sending signals to his body and that his body was responding. The growth mindset not only helped him, but his example also changed the entire way science thinks about the nervous system and its recovery potential.

The examples of the CEOs of the top companies of the world show, that without an open mindset, the company doesn’t develop. This happened to Chrysler Motors. It kept producing the same car models over and over with only superficial changes. Meanwhile, the Japanese were not afraid of big changes or challenges and their cars were redesigned completely. They quickly took the market